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Why We Will Soon Be Wearing Our Doctors

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“Monitoring patients usually requires visits to the doctor, invasive tests and bulky, expensive devices. But what if getting a checkup were as simple as slapping on a Band-Aid?

  Such is the potential of bioelectronics, an emerging field whose leaders are developing small, wearable, wi-fi-enabled sensors that can detect all kinds of vital information — heart rate, body temperature, hydration levels — and relay them to your doctor or your smartphone in real time. Once patients have the big data about their bodies, the thinking goes, they can be proactive about their health, cut care costs and foster better relationships with their doctors. “We want to change the world,” proclaims David Icke, CEO of bioelectronics firm MC10, which is leading the health-sensor charge.”

 

Eric Topol

It is such a privilege for me to introduce Dr. Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute, who is also one of the leading forces in establishing wireless medicine techniques. I highly encourage you to watch his very thought provoking TED talk in which he elaborates on how the improvement of technology is going to improve health services. He is a very dedicated health professional who declares that these days, he prescribes a lot more apps than he does medications. This statement is according to his interview with nbc news (title: “The key to better health care may already be in your pocket… and it’s not your wallet”).

A survey held by Harris Interactive and HealthDay reveals that many smartphone owners like to use their smartphones to ask their doctors questions, book appointments, and check the effects and side effects of medication. In terms of treatments and diagnosis, many like to check their blood pressure, monitor their heartbeat to find irregularities, monitor their glucose levels, track weight, nutrition, and other health factors using a mobile gadget and its applications.

Hence, The direction health services are going to take is going to depend on preventive powers of WIRELESS MEDICINE rather than chemical prescription drugs that are expected to “cure” patients. In the near future, the process of going through a wait-list at a doctor’s office can replace with individual health examination. Consequently, a part of doctor’s responsibility to monitor our health is going to be our own responsibility. Is this trend going to help us take responsible actions for keeping track of our health?

 

smartHealth 

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